301 Moved Permanently

301 Moved Permanently


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Further Reading: Reviews by 49th Shelf

Have Not Been the Same

Have Not Been the Same: The Canrock Renaissance 1985-1995, by Michael Barclay, Ian A.D. Jack and Jason Schneider

About the book: Capturing the spirit of Canadian rock from the late 20th century, this history tells the stories of the musicians and bands that made an indelible mark on Canadian culture and the global stage. Regarded by critics and musicians as the definitive history of the era, this massive tome has been updated to include brand-new interviews and up-to-the-present histories of the bands from Canada’s homegrown music industry, including Blue Rodeo, the Tragically Hip, Sarah McLachlan, Sloan, Barenaked Ladies, Daniel Lanois, and many others. Rich, extensive first-person interviews pair with a treasure trove of rare photos in this one-of-a-kind masterpiece, making it one of the seminal works in the field of Canadian music writing and a must-read for any Canadian music fan.

Book Cover Gods of the Hammer

Gods of the Hammer: The Teenage Head Story, by Geoff Pevere

About the book: In the late 1970s and early 1980s, no Canadian band rocked harder, louder or to more hardcore fans than Hamilton, Ontario’s own Teenage Head. Although usually lumped in the dubiously inevitable “punk rock” category of the day, this high-energy quartet consisting of four guys who’d known each other since high school were really only punk by association. In essence they were a full-on, balls-to-the-wall, three-chord, kick-out-the-jams band that obliterated categories and labels with the sheer force of their sonic assault, and everywhere they played they converted the merely curious to the insanely devoted.

And they almost became world famous. Almost. This is their story, told in full and for the first time, and by those who lived to tell the tale.

Book Cover Perfect Youth

Perfect Youth: The Birth of Canadian Punk, by Sam Sutherland

About the book: While many volumes devoted to the punk and hardcore scenes in America grace bookstore shelves, Canada’s contributions to the genre remain largely unacknowledged. For the first time, the birth of Canadian punk’s transformative cultural force that spread across the country at the end of the 1970s is captured between the pages of this important resource. Delving deeper than standard band biographies, this book articulates how the advent of punk reshaped the culture of cities across Canada, speeding along the creation of alternative means of cultural production, consumption, and distribution. Describing the origins of bands such as D.O.A., the Subhumans, the Viletones, and Teenage Head alongside lesser-known regional acts from all over Canada, it is the first published account of the first wave of punk in places like Regina, Ottawa, Halifax, and Victoria. Proudly staking Canada’s claim as the starting point for many internationally famous bands, this book unearths a forgotten musical and cultural history of drunks and miscreants, future country stars, and political strategists.

Book Cover Treat Me Like Dirt

Treat Me Like Dirt: An Oral History of Punk in Toronto and Beyond, by Liz Worth

About the book: This gritty chronicle illustrates the emergence of punk rock in Toronto for the first time. The visionary bands that brought the original scene to life—and who still maintain loyal fans across North America—are documented in detail, from the Diodes, Viletones, and Teenage Head to the B-Girls, Forgotten Rebels, Johnny & the G-Rays, and more. Full of chaos, betrayal, failure, success, and pure rock ‘n’ roll energy, this layered history is assembled from interviews with those now recognized as innovators, pioneers, and outright legends in their genre. Their accounts go beyond run-of-the-mill anecdotes, venturing into the uncharted territory of sex, drugs, murder, conspiracy, violence, criminals, and biker gangs. Bold and brazen, this compilation also includes a wealth of previously unpublished photographs as well as one of the last interviews with the late Frankie Venom, lead singer of Teenage Head.

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